Using 911

  1. When to Call 911
  2. How to Report a Crime
  3. The Five Ws
You should only call 9-1-1 in EMERGENCIES – when you or someone else is seriously hurt or is experiencing life-threatening conditions. An emergency is any situation that requires the immediate assistance of a police officer, fire fighter or emergency medical services.

Emergency

  • Crime in progress
  • Fire
  • Breathing problems
  • Choking
  • Unconsciousness
  • Poisoning
  • Drowning
  • Stabbing
  • Gun shot wounds
  • Struck by vehicle
  • Child locked in vehicle
Non-Emergency

  • Minor accident (no injury)
  • Barking dogs
  • Burglarized property (ONLY if you know the property has no one inside and the Burglary is not in progress)
  • Power outage
  • Drug sale
  • Loud Parties
  • Weather and road conditions
  • Scores for sporting events
  • Runaways
  • Legal advice
  • Keys locked in vehicle (no child inside)
If your situation IS an emergency…

  1. Dial 9-1-1
  2. Clearly state where you are
  3. Calmly tell the operator which emergency agency you need:
    1. Police
    2. Fire
    3. Ambulance / Emergency Medical Service
  4. Clearly state what your emergency is.
  5. Give your address AND the nearest intersecting cross street (very important for verifying the address – example:
    1. I live in Needham at 237 CR 945 just north of Highway 18.
    2. If an address is not available, use landmarks such as billboards, mile markers, buildings, etc. to describe the location.
  6. Stay on the line – do not hang up until the operator has all necessary information and tells you it is okay to hang up.
The operator may ask you questions regarding the emergency or provide you with instructions for stabilizing a patient before an ambulance arrives. If possible, stay by the phone in case the 9-1-1 call-taker needs to call you back.

If you are in a situation that IS an emergency, but speaking would put you in more danger and you have a cell phone…


  1. Go to your text messaging application on your cell phone.
  2. Enter 870-882-0911 as the recipient.
  3. In the message, state which emergency agency you need:
    1. Police
    2. Fire
    3. Ambulance/Emergency Medical Service
  4. Clearly state what your emergency is.
  5. Give your address AND the nearest intersecting cross street (very important for verifying the address) – example:
    1. I live in Monette at 123 Main Street near Highway 18
    2. I live south of Jonesboro at 1599 Highway 163 near County Road 422
    3. I live in Needham at 237 CR 945 just north of Highway 18.
    4. If an address is not available, use landmarks such as billboards, mile markers, buildings, etc. to describe the location.
The operator may ask you questions regarding the emergency. Please be sure to respond to any questions that the dispatcher may respond with to get additional information. If the message is longer than a single text message, it will be broken up into multiple message, but a dispatcher will respond to let you know that assistance is on the way.